Girl Scouts fresno

activity list . badge - journeys: girl sports: events: life skills: girl training: adult training Help Girl Scouts of Central California South spread the word about 2020 Fresno Women Inspiring Girls Society Awards - Powered by GiveSmart Girl Scouts of Central California South provides more than 11,000 girls every year in Fresno, Kern, Kings, Madera and Tulare Counties with learning and leadership skills that enable them to reach their full potential in a fun and nurturing environment. This includes more than 5,000 underserved girls from inner-city, rural and migrant communities, who participate in our Girl Scouts Connect program. Our Girl Scout community is living in unprecedented times. Several factors in our valley, state, country, and world are causing anxiety and uncertainty. Please know that the Board and Executive staff of Girl Scouts of Central California South are staying true to the organization’s mission of making Girl Scouts available to ALL girls in our ... Girl Scouts is where girls can explore, discover, and be themselves! From outdoor adventures to science experiments to saving a park or developing new skills, Girl Scouting prepares girls for a lifetime of leadership. Gold Award Girl Scouts are the dreamers and the doers who take “make the world a better place” to the next level. The Girl Scout Gold Award is the the mark of the truly remarkable—proof that not only can she make a difference, but that she already has. Cathy Ferguson of Fresno is CEO of the Girl Scouts of Central California South. Connect with her at 800-8653, Ext. 129. Comments . Read Next Valley Voices Welcome to the official online store of Girl Scouts of Central California South! Your purchase here helps our council earn revenue that provides programs and training for more than 10,000 girls and 2,500 adults in Fresno, Madera, Kings, Tulare and Kern Counties. Girl Scouts is the BEST place for girls! You want the very best for your girl, and so do we. BE A GIRL SCOUT. Volunteer. Be a mentor, a guiding star, a friend. Show them all that they’re capable of, and unleash your inner leader. GET STARTED. We're turning Girl Scout into a verb. Girl Scouts prepares girls for a lifetime of leadership, success, and adventure. Our new PSA features inspiring Girl Scout alums who show how an unstoppable woman on a powerful mission can make huge impact. They’ve changed the world---and that’s a job for a Girl Scout! Continue >

Girl Scouts Say These Fresno Women Inspire As Role Models and Trailblazers

2020.01.20 20:54 gvwire Girl Scouts Say These Fresno Women Inspire As Role Models and Trailblazers

Girl Scouts Say These Fresno Women Inspire As Role Models and Trailblazers submitted by gvwire to gvwire [link] [comments]


2019.11.09 08:31 derkimster On This Date In California Weather History (November 8)

2008: A Pacific storm arrived in Central California on November 8th. Showers and thunderstorms developed over the San Joaquin Valley floor during the evening, with one thunderstorm dropping 0.37" of rain in only 10 minutes near Melvin (Fresno Co.). Minor street flooding was reported in metro Fresno from this storm, possibly exacerbated by debris-clogged storm drains. Minor street flooding was also reported in the Clovis area. This storm system also brought strong winds to the Kern County Mountains and deserts with peak wind gusts of 50-60 mph, especially in the favored passes and canyon areas. 2005: The first significant snow of the winter season moved across the northern portion of Interior Central California and brought several inches of snow to higher elevations of the Southern Sierra Nevada. Mammoth Mountain reported 8" of new snow at the 9000 foot elevation during the night of the 7th and early morning of the 8th. 2002: After a relatively benign active weather month in October, November also started slow for Interior Central California. However, the first major trough off from the East Pacific combined with tropical moisture from Hurricane Huko a southern latitudes brought copious amounts of rain (snow levels at or above 9,000 feet Mean Sea Level) and gusty wind at higher elevations from the 7th until early on the 9th. What was unusual for this area was the change from the normal summefall dry conditions to the wet season in such dramatic fashion with little in the way of transition. During the period in the Southern Sierra Nevada 46" of new snow fell at Volcanic Knob and Upper Burnt Corral; and in the Tulare County Mountains 80" fell at Chagoopa Plateau. Numerous foothill locations received 5-10" of rain within the 3-day period in the foothills of the Southern Sierra Nevada. Johnsondale, in Tulare County received 16.38" of rain in the 3-day period. On the San Joaquin Valley floor Merced received 1.80" in 3 days, Fresno1.76"; Hanford 1.44"; and, Bakersfield 1.29." Rainfall amounts for the 8th were over 1" at several Valley locations thereby establishing new 24-hour rainfall records, e.g. Fresno's old record for the 8th was 0.23" ... new record 0.98". There were 23 pole fires caused by wind and arcing reported by Southern California Edison utility and ultimately affected 102,000 residents in the Central and Southern S.J. Valley. 2002: The first storm of the winter season moved onshore bringing heavy rain and windy conditions for Interior Central California on the7th. Numerous locations reported gusty wind with damage reported to powerlines due to arcing and felled trees. In the Kern Mountains poles were downed in the Weldon and Onyx area east of Lake Isabella and around Mt.Mesa and Southlake around 3:30AM on the 8th. In the Kern Desert, Indian Wells Canyon and Laural Mountain reported wind in excess of 50 MPH at both locations. This significant frontal passage brought gusty wind with speeds of 40 to 44 MPH across the Central San Joaquin Valley and into the neighboring foothills of the Southern Sierra Nevada. In conjunction with this multiple day precipitation event from the 7th through the 9th, gusty wind continued to buffet the Kern County Mountains and Deserts. Wind was often reported with 40+MPH gusts at several different automated reporting sites. There were spikes of 74 and 91 MPH at Indian Wells Canyon at 1613 PST and 1713 PST in the early afternoon of the 9th during the event.In the Mojave area winds again were generally around 40+MPH on the 8th into the 9th with a few gusts to 60 Knots at the Inyokern Airport during the afternoon of the 9th. 2002: Tehachapi in Kern County reported 4.67" of rain and Lodgepole in Tulare County received 11.55" of rain in the 3-day period from the 7th to the 9th along with the 16.38" at Johnsondale. Despite the very dry antecedent conditions, this amount of rainfall lead to flooding problems...especially in and around the Tulare County Mountains. Snow levels were relatively high, at 9000 feet MSL. Park Dispatch reported washouts on Parker Pass Road and the Road below Durwood Resort in Southeast Tulare County, as well as the road that leads from Johnsondale southward to Kernville in Kern County. Flooding also occurred along Highway 178 near Kelso in Kern County (Glennville received 6" of rain); rock/mudslides occurred on Highway 168 and Highway 180 in the S.Sierra Nevada foothills; and, with numerous rock/mudslides, and road erosion problems, the Tulare County foothill roadways of the General's Highway and Mineral King were closed. Sequoia National Park had to evacuate folks from a flooded trailer park near Ash Mountain on the morning of the 9th. Due to erosion problems with the McNally Fire in Southeast Tulare and Northeast Kern Counties, debris was spread across many mountain roads in the area as well as contributing to a fish kill in the Kern River. Additional flooding and mudslide problems were noted along Highway 178 in Kern County. Peak flow into Lake Isabella from the Kern River was 26,500CFS on Friday night, the 8th. The lake storage increased from 82,000 acre-feet to 109,000 acre-feet and increased in elevation 5 feet in a 2-day period from the 8th to 9th.
2002: The first significant cold front of the year swept through the region,bringing 2 days of orographically enhanced precipitation.
Rainfall along the favored slopes of the San Bernardino Mountains reached 10", while totals in the mountains of San Diego County approached 4". Lacking in topography, only 0.20" fell at San Diego International.
Although the coast missed out on the intense rain, the beaches were still pounded by surf reaching 10 to 15 feet.
2002: Priest Valley (Monterey Co.) received 3.80" of rain -- a record for the month.
1999: First Winter Storm of the season (lowered threshold) as 8" of snow fell at Tuolumne Meadows overnight. Snow levels were restricted to higher elevations (generally above 6500 feet MSL). The first substantial autumn rain (and first since 4/12/99) led to transmission line transformer shorts and power loss to 14,000 local utility customers in the Central and Southern San Joaquin Valley. The problems were repaired by the afternoon of the 8th. Rainfall amounts on the San Joaquin Valley floor varied from 0.20" to 0.66" of rain ... and 1.0" to 1.5" in the adjacent foothills.
1998: Mountain wave activity led to strong winds along the north and east slopes of the San Bernardino Mountains. Winds gusted to 50 mph in Hesperia, Joshua Tree and Twentynine Palms. Trees, powerlines and fences were blown down, while a series of portable toilets were toppled at a Girl Scout camp.
1961: The morning low temperature at Reno, NV, was 14° F.
1952: Indio received 1.60" of rain on this day, the greatest one-day rainfall total on record for November. This is also one of only 4 times the city has received a daily rainfall of 1" or more in November since 1894. The city’s most recent one-inch daily rainfall in November occurred in 1985.
1922: 11" of snow fell at both Tahoe City and Sierraville.
1918: Bakersfield reached 95° F for a high, setting a record for the month of November. This record was tied on November 3, 1921.
1914: In Bagdad (Mojave Desert), this was the final day of an incredible dry spell of 767 days that started on 10/3/1912 (Southern Pacific RR employees kept this debated record).
1914: Santa Barbara reached 98° F establishing an all-time high for November.
1910: The main part of Harrison Gulch (Shasta County) was in ashes. A withering blast of flame spread through the business part of town Sunday evening, taking all before it as tinder until stopped by the dynamiting of the Morrissey house, where the brave citizen firemen made a last stubborn stand that resulted in mastery over the flames.
Source: NWS Monterey/San Francisco, NWS Hanford, Reno, & San Diego as well as the Redding Record-Searchlight
submitted by derkimster to CaliforniaDisasters [link] [comments]


2019.08.12 15:24 NathanGa Slap Shots and Self-Pleasure: A critical historical assessment of a hockey film classic

Without question, the greatest sports movie in cinema history is the 1977 classic “Slap Shot”, starring Paul Newman and Michael Ontkean – and a host of actual pro hockey players filling in various roles. You're free to disagree with me by citing any of a number of other classic sports movies, but you are simply wrong. Although there are some fine sports movies, and a few that rise to the highest strata of cinema, “Slap Shot” trumps them all.
The movie was written by Nancy Dowd; the genesis of it came when Nancy received a phone call from her (hockey-playing) brother Ned, who was drunkenly regaling her with stories from life in the minor leagues. During the conversation, Ned mentioned that his team was being sold and he had no idea who even owned the team he was playing on (the Johnstown Jets of the North American Hockey League [NAHL]). Nancy, with no film credit to her name, started writing a story based on a minor-league team with an uncertain future and an unknown owner. Much of the screwball antics that take place during the movie, by the way, were either true or mostly true.
In “Slap Shot”, we follow the minor-league Charlestown Chiefs, a minor-league team with an unknown owner and an uncertain future with the imminent closure of the local steel mill. Player-coach Reg Dunlop (Newman) clashes with star player Ned Braden (Ontkean), and with Chiefs' general manager Joe McGrath (longtime Western film veteran Strother Martin). The film opens with a Chiefs' loss, followed by a promotional fashion show featuring clothes modeled by irate Chiefs players. Dunlop and McGrath continue to clash, and it comes to a head when McGrath orders Dunlop to the local bus station to pick up “the new boys”.
Dunlop's mood turns to annoyance when he arrives at the station and finds three teenagers in Coke-bottle glasses pummeling a vending machine over a quarter. And the annoyance turns to rage when he gets the three checked in at a hotel and sees that their luggage is filled with toy cars. Arriving at the arena, he storms after McGrath and calls him a “cheap son of a bitch”, before this legendary exchange.
McGrath: I got a good deal on those boys. The scout said they showed a lot of promise.
Dunlop: They brought their fuckin' toys with 'em!
McGrath: I'd rather have 'em play with their toys than with themselves.
Dunlop: They're too dumb to play with themselves! Every piece of garbage on the market, you gotta buy it!
McGrath: Reg. Reg, that reminds me. I was coachin' in Omaha in 1948, and Eddie Shore sends me this guy that's a terrible masturbator. Couldn't control himself. He would get deliberate penalties so he could get into the penalty box all by himself, and damned if he wouldn't, you know, mm-mm-mmm-mmmm...
Dunlop: Oh, Joe, geez.
McGrath: Oh, what was his name...
Later in the movie, we see a brawl that takes place during pre-game warmups. This is based on an actual event. We see a brawl in which players go into the stands to fight fans after being hit by objects thrown by spectators, with some players being arrested and then bailed out of jail – this also happened (even before the infamous Mike Milbury shoe-beating event!). And of course, nearly anyone who played minor league hockey in the 1970s can tell stories about the rest: the long bus rides, the chasing girls, the local economic instability of small towns, getting up close and personal with enraged opposing fans...it all rings true in the world of hockey.
But the idea of a player who would take deliberate penalties in order to play with himself in the penalty box? In a movie that's so heavily based on true stories, is there anything to this?
Let's begin.
Pro hockey got its start in Omaha for the 1939-40 season, as the Knights of the American Hockey Association took the ice for the first time. In their first year of existence, the Knights qualified for the playoffs. In the semi-finals, they knocked out the St. Louis Flyers in a best-of-five series which featured four one-goal games. But in the finals, the St. Paul Saints defeated Omaha, three games to one, to take the championship. (Between Omaha in 1939-40 and Vegas in 2017-18, maybe all first-year hockey teams should be called the Knights!)
Omaha missed the playoffs the next year (1940-41). But in 1941-42, after finishing third in their division, the Knights went on a tear and swept though all three playoff rounds to take the championship. And as it turned out, this would be the last game played in AHA history – World War II forced many industries to close their doors for the duration, and minor league hockey was no exception.
In 1945, some of the leftover AHA teams formed a new league: the United States Hockey League (USHL), which was a minor league that is unrelated to the modern-day USHL. The 1945-46 Knights lost in the first round of the playoffs, despite the presence of a Saskatchewan farm boy named Gordie Howe. The 1946-47 team lost in the finals against the Kansas City Pla-Mors.
And this bring us to the 1947-48 season. Now, in “Slap Shot”, Joe McGrath simply says, “I was coachin' in Omaha in 1948, and Eddie Shore sends me this guy...”, which does not specify whether the player in question was acquired in the latter half of the 1947-48 season or in the first half of the 1948-49 season. Either way, we'll keep going.
Eddie Shore, a Hall of Fame defenseman and widely regarded as one of the all-time great players, has a load of legendary stories about him. There's the one about how a player's stick almost completely sliced his ear off, and no doctor would attempt to re-attach it. Shore found one who would, rejected anesthetic, and insisted on holding a mirror to “make sure that you sew it on straight”. There's the one about how he missed the team's train to Montreal, so he caught a cab, alternated driving duties with the cabbie, and eventually crashed into a snowbank – upon this bit of misfortune, Shore simply hitchhiked and then walked the rest of the way, arriving minutes before the opening faceoff...and he then played 58 out of 60 minutes (the only two minutes off being a penalty that he took), and scored the only goal in a 1-0 Bruins win.
Now, this was during his playing career. In 1940, Shore purchased the Springfield Indians of the American Hockey League and ran every part of the team. This story from Sports Illustrated, dated March 13 1967 and written by Stan Fischler, describes only a small part of what it was like to play under Shore in Springfield. (Not featured in this article is the thoughts of former Springfield defenseman Don Cherry, who referred to Shore as “The Prince of Darkness” for a multitude of reasons.)
From the linked article:
Can anyone believe a man would open a training camp by ordering two dozen rugged hockey players to tap dance in the hotel lobby or execute delicate ballet steps on ice? Would any ordinary coach tape a player's hands to his stick? Or work out day after day with players despite four near-fatal heart attacks? Is it conceivable that a club owner would instruct players' wives to avoid relations with their husbands in the interest of a winning team? Is it conceivable, either, that a man would actually lock a referee out of his dressing room as punishment for "poor" officiating? Or order his players to make popcorn, blow up balloons and sell programs when they're not in the game?
And one more: is it conceivable that such a coach would discover that one of his players had a habit of excessive self-pleasure, and ship him off to any team that would take him before this could be discovered? Knowing Shore, who once had his goalie tied to the net in practice to prevent the goalie from flopping to the ice to make a save, the answer is “yes”. But...did it happen?
In 1947-48, Omaha suited up twenty-four different players during the season, including future first-ballot Hall of Fame goalie Terry Sawchuk. Of these twenty-four players, eight of them played for a different team at some point during the 1947-48 season: Sawchuk played three games with the Windsor Hettche Spitfires of the IHL, Paul Gauthier played 27 games with the Houston Huskies of the USHL, Max McNab played twelve games with the NHL's Detroit Red Wings, Harvey Jessiman played 38 games with the Philadelphia Rockets of the AHL, and four other players (Calum MacKay, Al Dewsbury, Bruce Burdette, and Thain Simon) played games with the Indianapolis Capitals of the AHL. None of them played a single game with Shore's Springfield Indians, although five of them played games with other AHL teams.
So it must have been the 1948-49 Omaha Knights who had the player in question. This team only had twenty different players suit up during the season, so finding the answer should be easy.
Of the twenty players on the 1948-49 Knights, only five played with another team at any point during the season: forward Gordon Haidy (48 games with Indianapolis), and goalies Don MacDonald, Bob DeCourcy, Jim Shirley, and Gordie Bell. MacDonald played a single game with the Fresno Falcons of the PCHL, DeCourcy a couple games with Kansas City in the USHL, Shirley with St. Louis of the AHL. Gordie Bell, meanwhile, suited up with the Fort Worth Rangers of the USHL...and with Springfield of the AHL.
So there was in fact a single player who suited up with both Omaha of the USHL and with Shore's Springfield Indians of the AHL in the 1948-49 season, although the date that he arrived in Omaha and where he had just been are unknown.
But remember, in “Slap Shot”, Joe McGrath specifically said that the player would take deliberate penalties to get into the penalty box...
According to the stat page for the 1948-49 Springfield Indians, the team run by Eddie Shore, Bell played four games in goal and had no penalty minutes. In 13 games with the 1948-49 Fort Worth Rangers, Bell played thirteen games and had no penalty minutes. And in Omaha in 1948-49, a team coached by McGrath, Bell played 36 games in goal...and had no penalty minutes.
“Wait!”, you may say, “I see a separate line! Bell did have two penalty minutes in his four playoff games with Omaha!” Well, yes, he did. But there's a problem there as well.
Goalies don't serve their own penalties.
In “Slap Shot”, McGrath said a lot of things that didn't quite mesh with reality. He swore that the team wasn't being sold, which was untrue. He swore it wasn't going to fold, which was untrue. He said there were NHL scouts in the stands, which was untrue. He said an awful lot of things, none of which were true. It looks like we can add one more to the list of McGrath's false statements.
TL;DR - Joe McGrath did not coach a player in 1948 in Omaha, who he got from Eddie Shore's Springfield team, who would take deliberate penalties for the purpose of self-pleasure. The only player who Omaha had at all during that time period who came from Springfield at all was a goalie who took one single penalty, and goalies don't even serve their own penalties.
Bonus viewing of the movie scene in question
Special thanks are due to ralphslate, founder of hockeydb.com – I've been using Ralph's site for over 20 years, and it's the first site I go to for quickly-accessible hockey stats
Additional bonus viewing from the movie with the Syracuse Bulldogs' special lineup for the championship game. Pro players Connie Madigan, Joe Nolan, Mark Bousquet, Blake Ball, and Ned Dowd – the original inspiration for the movie – all make appearances.
submitted by NathanGa to hockey [link] [comments]


2019.08.12 15:23 NathanGa Slap Shots and Self-Pleasure: A critical historical assessment of a hockey film classic

Without question, the greatest sports movie in cinema history is the 1977 classic “Slap Shot”, starring Paul Newman and Michael Ontkean – and a host of actual pro hockey players filling in various roles. You're free to disagree with me by citing any of a number of other classic sports movies, but you are simply wrong. Although there are some fine sports movies, and a few that rise to the highest strata of cinema, “Slap Shot” trumps them all.
The movie was written by Nancy Dowd; the genesis of it came when Nancy received a phone call from her (hockey-playing) brother Ned, who was drunkenly regaling her with stories from life in the minor leagues. During the conversation, Ned mentioned that his team was being sold and he had no idea who even owned the team he was playing on (the Johnstown Jets of the North American Hockey League [NAHL]). Nancy, with no film credit to her name, started writing a story based on a minor-league team with an uncertain future and an unknown owner. Much of the screwball antics that take place during the movie, by the way, were either true or mostly true.
In “Slap Shot”, we follow the minor-league Charlestown Chiefs, a minor-league team with an unknown owner and an uncertain future with the imminent closure of the local steel mill. Player-coach Reg Dunlop (Newman) clashes with star player Ned Braden (Ontkean), and with Chiefs' general manager Joe McGrath (longtime Western film veteran Strother Martin). The film opens with a Chiefs' loss, followed by a promotional fashion show featuring clothes modeled by irate Chiefs players. Dunlop and McGrath continue to clash, and it comes to a head when McGrath orders Dunlop to the local bus station to pick up “the new boys”.
Dunlop's mood turns to annoyance when he arrives at the station and finds three teenagers in Coke-bottle glasses pummeling a vending machine over a quarter. And the annoyance turns to rage when he gets the three checked in at a hotel and sees that their luggage is filled with toy cars. Arriving at the arena, he storms after McGrath and calls him a “cheap son of a bitch”, before this legendary exchange.
McGrath: I got a good deal on those boys. The scout said they showed a lot of promise.
Dunlop: They brought their fuckin' toys with 'em!
McGrath: I'd rather have 'em play with their toys than with themselves.
Dunlop: They're too dumb to play with themselves! Every piece of garbage on the market, you gotta buy it!
McGrath: Reg. Reg, that reminds me. I was coachin' in Omaha in 1948, and Eddie Shore sends me this guy that's a terrible masturbator. Couldn't control himself. He would get deliberate penalties so he could get into the penalty box all by himself, and damned if he wouldn't, you know, mm-mm-mmm-mmmm...
Dunlop: Oh, Joe, geez.
McGrath: Oh, what was his name...
Later in the movie, we see a brawl that takes place during pre-game warmups. This is based on an actual event. We see a brawl in which players go into the stands to fight fans after being hit by objects thrown by spectators, with some players being arrested and then bailed out of jail – this also happened (even before the infamous Mike Milbury shoe-beating event!). And of course, nearly anyone who played minor league hockey in the 1970s can tell stories about the rest: the long bus rides, the chasing girls, the local economic instability of small towns, getting up close and personal with enraged opposing fans...it all rings true in the world of hockey.
But the idea of a player who would take deliberate penalties in order to play with himself in the penalty box? In a movie that's so heavily based on true stories, is there anything to this?
Let's begin.
Pro hockey got its start in Omaha for the 1939-40 season, as the Knights of the American Hockey Association took the ice for the first time. In their first year of existence, the Knights qualified for the playoffs. In the semi-finals, they knocked out the St. Louis Flyers in a best-of-five series which featured four one-goal games. But in the finals, the St. Paul Saints defeated Omaha, three games to one, to take the championship. (Between Omaha in 1939-40 and Vegas in 2017-18, maybe all first-year hockey teams should be called the Knights!)
Omaha missed the playoffs the next year (1940-41). But in 1941-42, after finishing third in their division, the Knights went on a tear and swept though all three playoff rounds to take the championship. And as it turned out, this would be the last game played in AHA history – World War II forced many industries to close their doors for the duration, and minor league hockey was no exception.
In 1945, some of the leftover AHA teams formed a new league: the United States Hockey League (USHL), which was a minor league that is unrelated to the modern-day USHL. The 1945-46 Knights lost in the first round of the playoffs, despite the presence of a Saskatchewan farm boy named Gordie Howe. The 1946-47 team lost in the finals against the Kansas City Pla-Mors.
And this bring us to the 1947-48 season. Now, in “Slap Shot”, Joe McGrath simply says, “I was coachin' in Omaha in 1948, and Eddie Shore sends me this guy...”, which does not specify whether the player in question was acquired in the latter half of the 1947-48 season or in the first half of the 1948-49 season. Either way, we'll keep going.
Eddie Shore, a Hall of Fame defenseman and widely regarded as one of the all-time great players, has a load of legendary stories about him. There's the one about how a player's stick almost completely sliced his ear off, and no doctor would attempt to re-attach it. Shore found one who would, rejected anesthetic, and insisted on holding a mirror to “make sure that you sew it on straight”. There's the one about how he missed the team's train to Montreal, so he caught a cab, alternated driving duties with the cabbie, and eventually crashed into a snowbank – upon this bit of misfortune, Shore simply hitchhiked and then walked the rest of the way, arriving minutes before the opening faceoff...and he then played 58 out of 60 minutes (the only two minutes off being a penalty that he took), and scored the only goal in a 1-0 Bruins win.
Now, this was during his playing career. In 1940, Shore purchased the Springfield Indians of the American Hockey League and ran every part of the team. This story from Sports Illustrated, dated March 13 1967 and written by Stan Fischler, describes only a small part of what it was like to play under Shore in Springfield. (Not featured in this article is the thoughts of former Springfield defenseman Don Cherry, who referred to Shore as “The Prince of Darkness” for a multitude of reasons.)
From the linked article:
Can anyone believe a man would open a training camp by ordering two dozen rugged hockey players to tap dance in the hotel lobby or execute delicate ballet steps on ice? Would any ordinary coach tape a player's hands to his stick? Or work out day after day with players despite four near-fatal heart attacks? Is it conceivable that a club owner would instruct players' wives to avoid relations with their husbands in the interest of a winning team? Is it conceivable, either, that a man would actually lock a referee out of his dressing room as punishment for "poor" officiating? Or order his players to make popcorn, blow up balloons and sell programs when they're not in the game?
And one more: is it conceivable that such a coach would discover that one of his players had a habit of excessive self-pleasure, and ship him off to any team that would take him before this could be discovered? Knowing Shore, who once had his goalie tied to the net in practice to prevent the goalie from flopping to the ice to make a save, the answer is “yes”. But...did it happen?
In 1947-48, Omaha suited up twenty-four different players during the season, including future first-ballot Hall of Fame goalie Terry Sawchuk. Of these twenty-four players, eight of them played for a different team at some point during the 1947-48 season: Sawchuk played three games with the Windsor Hettche Spitfires of the IHL, Paul Gauthier played 27 games with the Houston Huskies of the USHL, Max McNab played twelve games with the NHL's Detroit Red Wings, Harvey Jessiman played 38 games with the Philadelphia Rockets of the AHL, and four other players (Calum MacKay, Al Dewsbury, Bruce Burdette, and Thain Simon) played games with the Indianapolis Capitals of the AHL. None of them played a single game with Shore's Springfield Indians, although five of them played games with other AHL teams.
So it must have been the 1948-49 Omaha Knights who had the player in question. This team only had twenty different players suit up during the season, so finding the answer should be easy.
Of the twenty players on the 1948-49 Knights, only five played with another team at any point during the season: forward Gordon Haidy (48 games with Indianapolis), and goalies Don MacDonald, Bob DeCourcy, Jim Shirley, and Gordie Bell. MacDonald played a single game with the Fresno Falcons of the PCHL, DeCourcy a couple games with Kansas City in the USHL, Shirley with St. Louis of the AHL. Gordie Bell, meanwhile, suited up with the Fort Worth Rangers of the USHL...and with Springfield of the AHL.
So there was in fact a single player who suited up with both Omaha of the USHL and with Shore's Springfield Indians of the AHL in the 1948-49 season, although the date that he arrived in Omaha and where he had just been are unknown.
But remember, in “Slap Shot”, Joe McGrath specifically said that the player would take deliberate penalties to get into the penalty box...
According to the stat page for the 1948-49 Springfield Indians, the team run by Eddie Shore, Bell played four games in goal and had no penalty minutes. In 13 games with the 1948-49 Fort Worth Rangers, Bell played thirteen games and had no penalty minutes. And in Omaha in 1948-49, a team coached by McGrath, Bell played 36 games in goal...and had no penalty minutes.
“Wait!”, you may say, “I see a separate line! Bell did have two penalty minutes in his four playoff games with Omaha!” Well, yes, he did. But there's a problem there as well.
Goalies don't serve their own penalties.
In “Slap Shot”, McGrath said a lot of things that didn't quite mesh with reality. He swore that the team wasn't being sold, which was untrue. He swore it wasn't going to fold, which was untrue. He said there were NHL scouts in the stands, which was untrue. He said an awful lot of things, none of which were true. It looks like we can add one more to the list of McGrath's false statements.
TL;DR - Joe McGrath did not coach a player in 1948 in Omaha, who he got from Eddie Shore's Springfield team, who would take deliberate penalties for the purpose of self-pleasure. The only player who Omaha had at all during that time period who came from Springfield at all was a goalie who took one single penalty, and goalies don't even serve their own penalties.
Bonus viewing of the movie scene in question
Special thanks are due to ralphslate, founder of hockeydb.com – I've been using Ralph's site for over 20 years, and it's the first site I go to for quickly-accessible hockey stats
Additional bonus viewing from the movie with the Syracuse Bulldogs' special lineup for the championship game. Pro players Connie Madigan, Joe Nolan, Mark Bousquet, Blake Ball, and Ned Dowd – the original inspiration for the movie – all make appearances.
submitted by NathanGa to badhistory [link] [comments]


2019.08.07 19:50 eventbot What's happening around town (Wed, Aug 7th - Tue, Aug 13th)

Oklahoma City's event list.

Ongoing

  • Concerts in the Park (Hafer Park - Edmond) Thru Thu, Aug 15th Hafer Park transforms into concert central Thursday evenings in the summer. Head to Edmond for the weekly Concerts in the…
  • Hamilton (Civic Center Music Hall - Oklahoma City) Thru Sun, Aug 18th Visit the Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall to watch OKC Broadway perform the story of Alexander Hamilton. Known as one…
  • Hicks and Booneshine (Noir Bistro & Bar - Oklahoma City) Thru Mon, Nov 25th Live talk show with Spencer Hicks and Kristy Boone.…

Wednesday, Aug 7th

  • 47th Annual Prix de West Invitational Art Exhibition and Sale (Western Heritage Museum - Oklahoma City) Thru Fri, Aug 9th Start Time: 10:00am PRIX DE WEST INVITATIONAL ART EXHIBITION & SALE Opening Weekend Events Friday, June 7, through Saturday, June 8, 2019 The Museum hosts its annual exhibition of more than 300 paintings and sculpture by the finest contemporary Western artists in the nation. This premier art exhibition features works ranging from historical pieces that reflect the…
  • 🏆 2019 $200,000 Added All Star Team Roping Finals (Lazy E Arena - Guthrie) Thru Fri, Aug 9th Start Time: 9:00am
  • American Quarter Horse Association Youth World Championship (Oklahoma State Fair Park - Oklahoma City) Thru Sat, Aug 10th Head to the Oklahoma State Fair Park in Oklahoma City for the exciting American Quarter Horse Youth Association World…
  • 🍴 Anthem Drown Night! (HiLo Club - Oklahoma City) Our local friends at Anthem Brewing Co. have some great beers! Every Wednesday night from 9pm to close enjoy $8 Drown Night! Their Power Pils will be flowing!
  • Bi-Weekly Meetup (51st st. Speakeasy - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 5:00pm
  • Bone Thugs-N-Harmony in Concert (Tower Theatre Studio - Oklahoma City) Join legendary rap collective Bone Thugs-N-Harmony for one very special evening as they take over the historic Tower Theatre…
  • 🎓 Botanical Balance FREE Yoga (Myriad Botanical Gardens - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 5:45pm Botanical Balance FREE YOGA presented by Fowler Toyota, sponsored by Tinker Federal Credit Union and Stephenson Cancer Center Tuesdays, 5:45 pm and Saturdays, 8 am Check in at the Visitor Center and find out location which changes depending on the season Instructors provided by This Land Yoga Bring a mat, water, and an “open mind”…
  • Chamber Ambassador Meeting (Del City Chamber of Commerce - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 8:30am
  • 🏆 Oklahoma City Dodgers vs. Tacoma Rainiers (Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark - Oklahoma City) Thru Fri, Aug 9th Start Time: 7:05pm
  • 🍴 Dope Poetry Night (ICE Event Center - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 7:30pm Every Wednesday night at the Ice Event Center Sports Bar and Grill located at the heart of Oklahoma City! Sign ups begin at 7pm and show begins at 7:30pmish. Free Admission! Free vendor set up! Bar Restaurant
  • 🎓 Mary Poppins: Step in Time Musical Theatre Workshop (Edmond Fine Arts - Edmond) Start Time: 2:00pm
  • Massive Moving Sale (Oklahoma Contemporary - Oklahoma City) Day 1 of 2 Start Time: 10:00am
  • Mighty Pines 8.7.19 / 89th Street - OK (89th Street Collective - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 7:00pm
  • 😂 Mike Baldwin (Loony Bin Comedy Club - Oklahoma City) Thru Sat, Aug 10th
  • SINGO Wednesdays (Lower Bricktown - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 6:30pm Beat the midweek hump with the new bar game that everyone is talking about! SINGO is a new and exciting musical spin on the traditional game of Bingo. Instead of listening for a number, players are listening to their favorite music. Enjoy 1/2 price domestic drafts & discounted appetizers! Plus we will be giving prizes each night to the winners.…
  • 🎨 Summer Signature Tour (Western Heritage Museum - Oklahoma City) Thru Fri, Aug 9th Start Time: 1:00pm
  • Support Art In Our Schools Exhibition and Supply Drive (Paseo - Oklahoma City) Thru Fri, Aug 9th Start Time: 11:00am
  • 🏃 Tai Chi and SAIL Classes Stay Active & Independent for Life: Wednesdays and Fridays (Edmond Senior Center - Edmond) Start Time: 1:30pm Come join us for these free exercise programs. Tai Chi class is one of the most effective exercises for the health of mind and body. SAIL (STAYING ACTIVE AND INDEPENDENT FOR LIFE) Sail is a fitness program for older adults, which can be done sitting or standing. Performing exercise that improves strength, balance and fitness is critical for…
  • Weekly Trivia Night (Othello's of Norman - Norman) Start Time: 8:00pm
  • Weekly Walkups: Reading Wednesdays (Myriad Botanical Gardens - Oklahoma City) Weekly Walkups June 24 – August 9, Monday – Friday, 10am – Noon Children’s Garden Porch Drop-in activities; $2 suggested donation per child Come to the Children’s Garden for some fun activities that explore the world of plants. Groups of 10 or more please contact Lily Christman, at 405-445-5162, for more information about group…
  • Western Movie Matinees (Western Heritage Museum - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 1:00pm Western Movie Matinee Dub & Mozelle Richardson Theater 1:00 p.m. Join us for these curated selections made possible with support from anonymous film fans. Popcorn provided. Free admission on Wide Open Wednesdays courtesy of the Oklahoma Ford Dealers.
    ¡Paseo! (Ride!): Caballeros, Vaqueros and Gauchos in American Films In an effort to explore…
  • Zumbini (Guthrie Library - Guthrie) Start Time: 10:30am

Thursday, Aug 8th

  • $13 Thursdays (Andy Alligator's Fun Park & Water Park - Norman) Start Time: 11:00am Craving fun? We’ve got you covered! Tickets to Andy Alligator’s Water Park are just $13 per person on Thursdays for a limited time. Save up to $7 per person and cool off with a family fun trip to the Water Park!
    Tickets must be purchased at the park. Not available online.
  • 47th Annual Prix de West Invitational Art Exhibition and Sale (Western Heritage Museum - Oklahoma City) 1 day left Start Time: 10:00am PRIX DE WEST INVITATIONAL ART EXHIBITION & SALE Opening Weekend Events Friday, June 7, through Saturday, June 8, 2019 The Museum hosts its annual exhibition of more than 300 paintings and sculpture by the finest contemporary Western artists in the nation. This premier art exhibition features works ranging from historical pieces that reflect the…
  • 🏆 2019 $200,000 Added All Star Team Roping Finals (Lazy E Arena - Guthrie) 1 day left Start Time: 9:00am
  • Advancing the Pencil Portrait, Part I (Western Heritage Museum - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 6:00pm
  • American Quarter Horse Association Youth World Championship (Oklahoma State Fair Park - Oklahoma City) Thru Sat, Aug 10th Head to the Oklahoma State Fair Park in Oklahoma City for the exciting American Quarter Horse Youth Association World…
  • Artist Talk: Michael Fischerkeller (Mainsite - Norman) Start Time: 6:00pm
  • Art Show at DNA Galleries (Plaza District - Oklahoma City) Thru Sun, Sep 8th Start Time: 6:00pm
  • Become a Museum Docent! (Western Heritage Museum - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 8:30am
  • The Book of Will (Paseo - Oklahoma City) Thru Sat, Aug 31st Visit Oklahoma City's Paseo District as Shakespeare on the Paseo presents: The Book of Will. This play, which will…
  • 🎨 Capturing Clouds by David Holland, Artist’s Reception (Myriad Botanical Gardens - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 5:00pm CAPTURING CLOUDS By David Holland Visitor Center Lobby, Crystal Bridge Exhibit run dates: July 18 – August 20, 2019 Opening Reception, Thursday, August 8, 5-7pm Free and open to the public
    Artist’s statement I am an avid sky watcher. Oklahoma is where I was born in 1959 and where I landed for good in 1977. The skies and cloudscapes I watch…
  • 🎭 The Comedy Magic & Mentalism of Max Krause 13+ (Max's Magic Theatre - OKC - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 9:15pm 13+ Ages
  • 🍴 Cookies & Cocktails (Farmer's Market - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 5:30pm Local restaurants, in partnership with Girl Scouts Western Oklahoma, will create a one-of-a-kind sweet or savory specialty snack using our famous Girl Scout Cookies. Guests will sip cocktails, sample treats from local restaurants, and compete for opportunity drawings and door prizes. Local “celebrities” will judge each entry and…
  • 🏆 Oklahoma City Dodgers vs. Tacoma Rainiers (Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark - Oklahoma City) 1 day left Start Time: 7:05pm
  • Global Leadership Summit (Crossings Community Church - Oklahoma City) Day 1 of 2 Start Time: 8:30am On August 8-9, 2019 from 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., you are invited to join 445,000+ people from around the world at the Global Leadership Summit 2019. Crossings Community Church (OKC Campus - 14600 North Portland Avenue, OKC, OK 73134) is privileged to be a host site once again for this outstanding simulcast live in HD from the Willow Creek campus. …
  • The Journal Record's 2nd Annual Battle of the Corporate Bands (UCO Jazz Lab - Edmond) Start Time: 6:00pm
  • 🎨 Kayla Ayrn, Emily J. Moore, & Jarica Walsh / Exhibition Opening (DNA galleries - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 6:00pm
  • Massive Moving Sale (Oklahoma Contemporary - Oklahoma City) Day 2 of 2 Start Time: 10:00am
  • 😂 Mike Baldwin (Loony Bin Comedy Club - Oklahoma City) Thru Sat, Aug 10th
  • Pedro the Lion & mewithoutYou in Concert (Tower Theatre Studio - Oklahoma City) Catch indie rock bands Pedro the Lion and mewithoutYou as they perform live at the Tower Theatre in Oklahoma City.…
  • 🎨 Summer Signature Tour (Western Heritage Museum - Oklahoma City) 1 day left Start Time: 1:00pm
  • Support Art In Our Schools Exhibition and Supply Drive (Paseo - Oklahoma City) 1 day left Start Time: 11:00am
  • The Truth about Your Aging Brain (Francis Tuttle Technology Center North Campus - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 10:00am ● Will we lose our memory as we age? ● Do thinking and reasoning eventually slow down? ● What are the signs of a healthy or unhealthy brain? ● Is there anything I can do to avoid having dementia?
    These are only a few of the questions to be addressed in the upcoming seminar on brain health and the aging brain.…
  • Weekly Walkups: Think Green Thursdays (Myriad Botanical Gardens - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 10:00am Weekly Walkups June 24 – August 9, Monday – Friday, 10am – Noon Children’s Garden Porch Drop-in activities; $2 suggested donation per child Come to the Children’s Garden for some fun activities that explore the world of plants. Groups of 10 or more please contact Lily Christman, at 405-445-5162, for more information about group…

Friday, Aug 9th

  • 2nd Friday Norman Art Walk (Norman Arts District - Norman) The 2nd Friday Norman Art Walk, a monthly celebration of the arts in Norman, connects the downtown arts district with…
  • 47th Annual Prix de West Invitational Art Exhibition and Sale (Western Heritage Museum - Oklahoma City) Last Day Start Time: 10:00am PRIX DE WEST INVITATIONAL ART EXHIBITION & SALE Opening Weekend Events Friday, June 7, through Saturday, June 8, 2019 The Museum hosts its annual exhibition of more than 300 paintings and sculpture by the finest contemporary Western artists in the nation. This premier art exhibition features works ranging from historical pieces that reflect the…
  • 🏆 2019 $200,000 Added All Star Team Roping Finals (Lazy E Arena - Guthrie) Last Day Start Time: 9:00am
  • American Quarter Horse Association Youth World Championship (Oklahoma State Fair Park - Oklahoma City) 1 day left Head to the Oklahoma State Fair Park in Oklahoma City for the exciting American Quarter Horse Youth Association World…
  • Annual Fanny Pack Fashion Show, August (Dig It - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 7:00pm
  • Art Show at DNA Galleries (Plaza District - Oklahoma City) Thru Sun, Sep 8th Start Time: 6:00pm
  • 🎨 Norman Art Walk (Norman Arts District - Norman) Start Time: 6:00pm
  • Be Inspired. Hear Ron Hall in OKC (Western Heritage Museum - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 5:30pm
  • The Book of Will (Paseo - Oklahoma City) Thru Sat, Aug 31st Visit Oklahoma City's Paseo District as Shakespeare on the Paseo presents: The Book of Will. This play, which will…
  • 😂 Brian Posehn - Live In OKC - Two Shows (The Paramount OKC - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 8:00pm
  • 🎭 Chickasha Community Theatre (Chickasha Community Theatre - Chickasha) Join us on August 9th! Free popcorn!
  • 🎓 DigIt Drag! Back to School Pep Rally with DigIt Queerleaders (Dig It - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 9:00pm
  • 🏆 Oklahoma City Dodgers vs. Tacoma Rainiers (Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark - Oklahoma City) Last Day Start Time: 7:05pm
  • Elaina Kay And Jared Deck (The Blue Door - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 8:00pm
  • Ellen Moershel // Michael Fischerkeller (Mainsite - Norman) Start Time: 6:00pm
  • FireLake Fireflight Balloon Festival (Firelake Arena - Shawnee) Start Time: 4:00pm Watch the Shawnee skyline transform into a mix of bright, brilliant colors as hot air balloons launch from the Citizen Potawatomi Nation Powwow Grounds....
  • Flea Market (Cleveland County Fairgrounds - Norman) Start Time: 8:00am
  • Global Leadership Summit (Crossings Community Church - Oklahoma City) Day 2 of 2 Start Time: 8:30am On August 8-9, 2019 from 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., you are invited to join 445,000+ people from around the world at the Global Leadership Summit 2019. Crossings Community Church (OKC Campus - 14600 North Portland Avenue, OKC, OK 73134) is privileged to be a host site once again for this outstanding simulcast live in HD from the Willow Creek campus. …
  • 🏃 HOTTEST Friday Night 5K (Stars & Stripes Park - Oklahoma City) The final race of the DG Productions' Sizzlin Summer Series
    www.sizzlinsummerseries.com
  • Jeremy Thomas Quartet Featuring Mike Mitchell (UCO Jazz Lab - Edmond) Start Time: 8:30pm Jeremy Thomas is a phenomenal jazz multi instrumentalist based out of Oklahoma City, OK where he is taking the music scene by storm. For this show, Jeremy is joined by a living true drum legend, Mike Mitchell! MIke Mitchell has also toured with R&B Erykah Badu, as well as such prominent jazz stars as Christian McBride, Christian Scott, Derrick…
  • Listen Local: Steelwind (University of Science & Arts of Oklahoma - Chickasha) Start Time: 7:30pm The 2019 season of the University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma’s Listen Local at The Greek concert series will come to a close on Aug. 9 with the bluegrass sextet Steelwind. Brought to you by the USAO Alumni Association, this free, outdoor concert will begin at 7:30 p.m. at the Greek theatre on the USAO campus. Everyone is welcomed to pack…
  • LIVE! on the Plaza: Back to School (Plaza District - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 6:00pm LIVE! on the Plaza is the Plaza District's free & monthly artwalk featuring art shows, live entertainment, great food and local shopping. Join us as we celebrate one of Oklahoma City's best monthly festivals!
    More details to be announced!
  • 😂 Mike Baldwin (Loony Bin Comedy Club - Oklahoma City) 1 day left
  • No Zodiac (89th Street Collective - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 7:00pm
  • On Holiday/ Hey Radio/ Stay The Course (Blue Note - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 9:00pm
  • 🎭 Opening Reception (Oklahoma City University - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 5:00pm
  • Outdoor Nation Expo (Firelake Arena - Shawnee) Thru Sun, Aug 11th Browse over 130 vendors at the Outdoor Nation Expo held at the FireLake Arena in Shawnee. This three-day event, held by a…
  • Oklahoma City Renovation & Landscaping Show (Oklahoma State Fair Park - Oklahoma City) Thru Sun, Aug 11th The Oklahoma City Renovation & Landscaping Show brings some of the area's most knowledgeable and…
  • 🎭 The Return of The Golden Girls (The Boom - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 8:00pm
  • Summer Celebration Series: Water (Myriad Botanical Gardens - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 10:00am Friday, August 9, 10am-2pm Children’s Garden Member $4; Nonmember $6 Join us for a splashing summer finale as we learn about the importance of water through demonstrations, hands-on activities, experiments, crafts, games and more. From hydroponics and aquaponics to marine life and conservation, it is sure to be waves of fun for the entire family!
  • 🎨 Summer Signature Tour (Western Heritage Museum - Oklahoma City) Last Day Start Time: 1:00pm
  • Support Art In Our Schools Exhibition and Supply Drive (Paseo - Oklahoma City) Last Day Start Time: 11:00am
  • 🏃 Tai Chi and SAIL Classes Stay Active & Independent for Life: Wednesdays and Fridays (Edmond Senior Center - Edmond) Start Time: 1:30pm Come join us for these free exercise programs. Tai Chi class is one of the most effective exercises for the health of mind and body. SAIL (STAYING ACTIVE AND INDEPENDENT FOR LIFE) Sail is a fitness program for older adults, which can be done sitting or standing. Performing exercise that improves strength, balance and fitness is critical for…
  • 🎨 The Third Wife (Oklahoma City Museum of Art - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 5:30pm

Saturday, Aug 10th

  • 21 Savage (The Criterion - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 8:00pm
  • American Quarter Horse Association Youth World Championship (Oklahoma State Fair Park - Oklahoma City) Last Day Head to the Oklahoma State Fair Park in Oklahoma City for the exciting American Quarter Horse Youth Association World…
  • Art Show at DNA Galleries (Plaza District - Oklahoma City) Thru Sun, Sep 8th Start Time: 6:00pm
  • Beats & Bites Festival (Riverwind Casino - Norman) Feast on delicious entrees and snacks from various food trucks at Riverwind Casino's Beats & Bites music and food…
  • The Book of Will (Paseo - Oklahoma City) Thru Sat, Aug 31st Visit Oklahoma City's Paseo District as Shakespeare on the Paseo presents: The Book of Will. This play, which will…
  • 🏆 Oklahoma City Dodgers vs. Reno Aces (Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark - Oklahoma City) Thru Tue, Aug 13th Start Time: 7:05pm
  • For King & Country in Concert (Starlight Amphitheater @ Frontier City - Oklahoma City) Spend the day splashing in the Renegade Rapids or screaming on the Silver Bullet at Frontier City Theme Park before relaxing…
  • Lynyrd Skynyrd: Last of the Street Survivors Farewell Tour (Chesapeake Energy Arena - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 7:00pm Join Southern rock pioneers Lynyrd Skynyrd for a very special evening as they rock the Cheapeake Energy Arena in Oklahoma…
  • 😂 Mike Baldwin (Loony Bin Comedy Club - Oklahoma City) Last Day
  • 🏆 OKC Energy FC vs. Fresno FC (Taft Stadium - Oklahoma City) Start Time: 8:00pm Experience the excitement of major league soccer in Oklahoma as the Oklahoma City Energy Football Club takes on Fresno FC at…
  • OKC Gun Show (Oklahoma State Fair Park - Oklahoma City) Day 1 of 2 For a high quality gun show with great prices and selection, visit the OKC Gun Show in Oklahoma City. Held at Oklahoma State…
  • OKC LitFest (Oklahoma City) Join the Oklahoma City Library in a celebration of all things language arts at the Downtown Oklahoma City Literary…
  • Outdoor Nation Expo (Firelake Arena - Shawnee) 1 day left Browse over 130 vendors at the Outdoor Nation Expo held at the FireLake Arena in Shawnee. This three-day event, held by a…
  • Oklahoma City Renovation & Landscaping Show (Oklahoma State Fair Park - Oklahoma City) 1 day left The Oklahoma City Renovation & Landscaping Show brings some of the area's most knowledgeable and…
  • 🏃 Run, Walk, or Roll for Independence (Mid-Del Group Homes - Midwest City) The second annual Mid-Del Group Home Run, Walk, or Roll for Independence Fun Run will be an event to remember! Walk, run, or roll this 5k to show support for an important and impactful organization.
    All proceeds from the event will directly benefit the Mid-Del Group Home
    Register by July 1st for the lower registration fees of $0 and $25. …

Sunday, Aug 11th

  • An Accordion Affair (Czech Hall - Yukon) Sit down and enjoy An Accordion Affair, an all-ages concert in Yukon featuring 23 accordionists. These musicians will…
  • Art Show at DNA Galleries (Plaza District - Oklahoma City) Thru Sun, Sep 8th Start Time: 6:00pm
  • The Book of Will (Paseo - Oklahoma City) Thru Sat, Aug 31st Visit Oklahoma City's Paseo District as Shakespeare on the Paseo presents: The Book of Will. This play, which will…
  • 🏆 Oklahoma City Dodgers vs. Reno Aces (Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark - Oklahoma City) Thru Tue, Aug 13th Start Time: 7:05pm
  • OKC Gun Show (Oklahoma State Fair Park - Oklahoma City) Day 2 of 2 For a high quality gun show with great prices and selection, visit the OKC Gun Show in Oklahoma City. Held at Oklahoma State…
  • Outdoor Nation Expo (Firelake Arena - Shawnee) Last Day Browse over 130 vendors at the Outdoor Nation Expo held at the FireLake Arena in Shawnee. This three-day event, held by a…
  • Oklahoma City Renovation & Landscaping Show (Oklahoma State Fair Park - Oklahoma City) Last Day The Oklahoma City Renovation & Landscaping Show brings some of the area's most knowledgeable and…
  • Sunday Twilight Concert Series (Myriad Botanical Gardens - Oklahoma City) Bring a lawn chair, a picnic and the whole family to the Sunday Twilight Concert Series on the Myriad Botanical…

Monday, Aug 12th

  • Art Show at DNA Galleries (Plaza District - Oklahoma City) Thru Sun, Sep 8th Start Time: 6:00pm
  • The Book of Will (Paseo - Oklahoma City) Thru Sat, Aug 31st Visit Oklahoma City's Paseo District as Shakespeare on the Paseo presents: The Book of Will. This play, which will…
  • 🏆 Oklahoma City Dodgers vs. Reno Aces (Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark - Oklahoma City) 1 day left Start Time: 7:05pm

Tuesday, Aug 13th

  • Art Show at DNA Galleries (Plaza District - Oklahoma City) Thru Sun, Sep 8th Start Time: 6:00pm
  • The Book of Will (Paseo - Oklahoma City) Thru Sat, Aug 31st Visit Oklahoma City's Paseo District as Shakespeare on the Paseo presents: The Book of Will. This play, which will…
  • 🏆 Oklahoma City Dodgers vs. Reno Aces (Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark - Oklahoma City) Last Day Start Time: 7:05pm
  • Wheeler Criterium (Oklahoma City) Once the weather starts warming up, gather your crew and head south of the Oklahoma River for the Wheeler Criterium each and…

See Also

submitted by eventbot to okc [link] [comments]


2018.03.06 01:15 realTylerBell Child of Sparrows

Hello mama, it’s June Bug.
I got no real idea how this might come to you, but by post or freight or law man’s hand, you should know it’s me this time. I read in the paper that folks been writin’ you on occasion saying they’re me and apologizing for all the mischief I got up to. I ain’t written to you but once since I left home and that’s right now. That reminds me of the sign up at Busser’s, one that hanged over the stationary? “If you’re going to write, write right!” Were they selling Bics, or what? I can’t remember.
Busser’s is where this all started but of course you know that. In fact, I presume you might know a whole lot more of this than when I left back in spring. Delilah is like to have told you how I met Todd — Mr. Lightnin’ T Daniels of national infamy — when he drove that fine Cadillac up to Busser’s for some ice cream. Maybe you’ve talked to the others, and they’ll have lied if they said I didn’t want to go with him.
I guess that’s all true, but what they didn’t tell you, couldn’t tell you, is that I saw Todd for the first time a week earlier. He was working up at the Targrady pits when we went up there on a field trip so the boys could see how they were going to make their money one day and the girls would know how hard their men were going to be worked. He smiled at Carla Weathers, not me, when we walked past him in a group, even tossed her a lump of furnace coal and told here there was more where that came from. She blushed, but so did I. I wanted a man like that to look at me.
Since I left Arson County, I’ve found that there are a lot of men like Todd, especially in the big cities. But just six long months ago I thought there couldn’t be a second man like him on earth. He was tall, bristling with muscle and sweaty charm, and polished smooth and clean looking despite the grime on his coveralls. He didn’t look like the fat, broken coal miners or their simple, soon-to-be-broken sons. He didn’t look either like the bloated, soft-handed bankers or turned-out souses that came up from the railyard for church some Sundays.
No, he was a man of his own making. He was smoking that first time, cloistered in a little taped-off area and leaning against a broken rail cart. He’d tied his coverall shoulders around his waist and his grimy undershirt clung to his torso like cellophane. Maybe every girl saw him. Maybe it was only me. I committed him to memory the way I had started doing with certain men, certain I’d never see him again. I was wrong, of course.
He came up to Busser’s a week later in a casual sort of hurry. Nonchalant but rushed, sauntering into the place and ordering an ice cream milkshake with a cherry on top. Mr. Pushkin gave him a mean look, but started smiling all the same when he dropped cash on the counter. Real hard currency, big bills like I’d never seen a man his age carrying before. He rested his back on the bar to drink and look around, his legs splayed out before him.
He had thick heels on the black leather boots that left dark scuffs on the floor. His jeans were tight, very tight for a man, and ended in a broad black belt at his hips. He had a white t-shirt on above that, also tight, and black leather jacket. He looked like an absolute criminal, and when he ran his hands through his hair, my God mother. I just didn’t know what to do with myself.
He doesn’t look like that now, as you might guess. By the time you get this letter, I suppose what beauty Todd had known on this earth will have all but fled him. But at that moment he looked like an angel. One of the kind that wasn’t afraid to tell God what he thought then and again, and I wanted him to fall into my arms.
He finished his drink and I followed him outside. The other girls, Delilah, Ethel, Mary, they squealed and urged me to come sit back down. None of them would have ever had the courage to follow him out that door, none of them did. They’ll live long lives, I suppose, telling their children about me as a cautionary tale. But I didn’t care what they had to say then and I certainly don’t now.
We talked by his car. I fixed my blue eyes on him they way I’d been practicing in the mirror, trying my best to look like one of them girls in the cigarette ads. It must have worked, cause he stopped telling me to get lost and got lost himself, running his hand through that hair and leaning against the car. I told him he had bad posture, and asked him real slow that if that car wasn’t there, what else would he like to lean against? You should have seen the look on his face.
Todd likes to try looking like a wolf. He licks his teeth, is the most noticeable thing, and I’d never seen a wolf before he took me to the zoo. That’s where I first made that connection. He could almost bristle that big jacket of his like a pelt, and he made himself stand on his toes, like he might spring at any minute. But he was a puppy on the worst of days. You and me, mama, we know about real wolves, don’t we?
He told me he liked the way I talked to him and I asked what he meant. He told me I shouldn’t play with fire and I told him I didn’t play with fire, but that my daddy let me use matches sometimes. He laughed and asked me what it was I was after and I told him he had a nice car. He asked if I wanted a ride. I said yes.
We drove out by the high school and he tried to put the moves on me. I said no and we drove some more. Up north into Carbones County, up past Gun Cotton and to the highway, then back down through roads I’d never seen before. Past little hamlets and nowhere towns full of staring black or white faces and the occasional house set into hillside where nobody could possibly get to it. He got quiet as we drove.
I asked him if he was mad I turned him down and he laughed and said that wasn’t it. He told me he wasn’t from West Virginia and had to be leaving soon. Real soon. I asked him how soon and he said tomorrow. Then he told me I might not want to be around Busser’s around noon and I asked why, though it’s obvious to anybody now what he meant by that. Then he dropped me off.
You were awful mad at me when I got home. Slapped me on the face as I recall, and hard too. I cried for you the way you like and ran in to daddy. He shushed me and patted me on the head. How is he now? Are you done with him? Is it time to move on again or are your wings too old to catch the wind? I’ll never know the answers to those questions, but I have my suspicions and they help me sleep nights.
I went to sleep and you woke me up in the middle of the night. I remember what you told me, though I won’t commit that hatefulness to paper. And you squeezed me where it hurts, twisted and pinched the way you do and told me not to ruin things the way I always did. You reminded me of what daddy had to lose for us to live there, what my life meant to the people around me.
And the second you left that room I packed what I thought I’d need in my backpack. I hid my school things under the bed, where I’m sure you eventually found them. I ate breakfast full knowing I was about to leave Blunt, West Virginia for the last time. To leave you for good. We had eggs. I told you they were delicious.
You rode me to school that day. I thought you’d figured me out, having done that same shuffle and ride a dozen or more times just in my lifetime. But you didn’t suspect a thing, not from your dear little June Bug. You sat there in the Packard, gripping the steering wheel with your prim white driving gloves, hair up underneath one of those silk headwraps you started wearing in Cincinnati.
You could have told me you loved me, any number of nice motherly things I see women say to their children in the movies Todd eventually took me to. But you just gave me your typical sermon, the one I always got after one of your late night visits. And you told me I was old now, old enough to be a threat if I didn’t watch myself. You reminded me I could be replaced. You warned me I better behave myself.
I watched you drive off down the dirt road that led to that dismal one-room learning shack they called a school and that was the last I ever saw of you. In person at least. I saw you in the news a few weeks later, crying on the front page of the Charleston Independent-Star and asking me to come home. Then a couple months after that on the New York Times, crying and telling me you better never see me again. That headline read, “Mother mourns recalcitrant daughter.” It made me smile.
I didn’t even go inside the school. Some of the other girls would eventually tell the police they saw me walking “with determination” toward some other destination. I actually stopped and talked with Debby Marks, and asked her to cover for me until the afternoon, just in case. I’ve never seen that detail in any newspapers so I guess she kept that little tidbit to herself. Smart girl.
I sat alone in Busser’s until noon, and he showed like clockwork. The shiny red Cadillac pulled up at the far end of the corner lot and he sat there alone, his eyes blocked by square black sunglasses. The armored truck pulled up a second later and I figured out the score right then and there.
The truck had the big Walther Hi-Sec Transportation Inc. logo down the side. Any kid in the valley could tell you that was the payroll wagon, here to bring cash down to the pit bank for payday. You take into account all the money they needed to pay the workers and make purchases, and there was maybe $20,000 in there. At least that’s what Todd thought.
A paunchy old man came in wearing a Walther Security uniform and Todd came in behind him. Now, things have been changed up a bit in the papers. Those newspapermen like to make a lot of interesting additions to the stories about us, particularly this one, painting Todd as some smooth Lothario who just talked people out of their money. Once we were famous, sure, that actually happened a couple times. But this time he was nervous. Scared even.
He smiled under those beetle-shell glasses and put the gun against the security man’s head. Told him to open up the back of the truck. And you know what that security man did? He said no! Honestly and truthfully, that old man, with his moustache and bent back, told big Lightnin’ T Daniels no and went back to his coffee. Todd might have just turned and walked out if not for me.
I screamed and ran to him, getting the attention of the few old men sitting around taking their coffee. Even Mr. Pushkin dropped his skillet in the kitchen and ran out. I wasn’t letting anybody ruin this for me. I jumped between Todd and the old man, pressing against the big automatic pistol with my chest so my breasts showed full and large to either side of it. He swallowed. I felt his insecurity.
I begged him not to hurt the old man, I’d do anything, just drop the gun and walk away. He recognized me and asked under his breath what I thought I was doing, and I yelled for him to take me instead at the top of his lungs. He grinned and pulled me close to him. I twirled into his arms like a dancer, relishing the warmth of his forearm against my cheek even as he pressed the automatic to my temple.
That display made short work of the Busser’s patrons. They begged Todd not to hurt me and I worked up some tears and hollered about how he was just confused. The old security guard looked at the other patrons like they’d lost their minds. I suppose they had. They almost tore the man’s clothes off trying to get at his keys so the big, bad man in the leather jacket wouldn’t hurt the pretty blonde.
It was like a dream how fast we went from the inside of that diner to driving down I-64 at nearly twice the speed limit, laughing like crazy. He didn’t even want to let me in the car with him at first, but I convinced him the locals were all heavily armed and would shoot him to pieces the second I left him. By the time we reached Charleston he didn’t even care. We counted the money from the heist in a filthy motel on the edge of town. Then we had sex.
It wasn’t wonderful, but I loved it all the same. The ecstasy of my escape from Blunt clouded over the meager pain of his entrance. I loved the smell of him, his sweat covering my chest and stomach. The way his arms crushed my body against his. It ended almost as quickly as it had began, and I let him finish where I shouldn’t have, but I didn’t care. I was free.
I slept in his arms on a pile of ill-gotten money. More cash than I’d seen in my whole life, $10,500. That was the first night of honest sleep I’d had in maybe my whole life, and the first time I hadn’t dreamed of little Trixie since that night by the old woodshed last fall. Little Trixie not-my-sister, as you might say.
Of course I don’t have to remind you of that, you were there. Or do I? I certainly haven’t seen you mention it all those wonderful little stories you’re in. I cut each one I find out of whatever paper and keep them in a small card box Todd bought me in Arizona. It has a turquoise June bug on the lid, which he thought was adorable. He’d bought himself one just like it that holds a bent, blackened spoon, some rubber tubing, and an oversized eye-dropper with a needle tied to the end.
My big, beautiful man had a bad habit. I was surprised how fast we could go through all that money, money you could live off for a year gone in just a few weeks. But he spent it on me too, buying me books and clothes and nice dinners at places where people spent big cash on little plates. He made new friends and lost them every week, even tried to lose me a couple times, but after a while he knew that I was his and, more importantly, that he was mine.
We traveled across the states, pulling that exact same heist we’d thrown together on the spot a Busser’s at every stop. I change my hair color after the papers started reporting on me, going from blonde to red and finally to black. I tried brown for a second but it reminded Todd of his mother and he wouldn’t touch me until I changed it. He talked about her, his mother, quite often.
I lied about you. I said you were great, real decent. I convinced him on that first sweaty night in Charleston that he’d left those nasty bruises on my nipples. I was just a fragile thing. He was too big and too rough. I also convinced him I wasn’t a virgin, because I couldn’t tell him that you’d broken me when I was twelve, kicking me between the legs because I wouldn’t stop crying. Because Brian not-my-brother and Pauline not-my-sister had kept calling my name as the car slipped beneath the waves at Glass Shard.
I never told him about any of that. About Kevin, or Julienne, or Matthew, or Ronald, or Victor, or Samuel, or Michelle, or Rebekah. The not-my-sisters and not-my-brothers I wasn’t allowed to mourn, and the parade of daddies who were only ever to be called daddy and not Mr. Kelso, or Mr. Valentine, or father, or papa, or dad. When we traveled through Cincinnati, Gary, Decatur, Chicago, and Pierre, I told him I’d never been to any of those places. All the while I glanced out the windows of our stolen cars, looking for that riverbank, that ash pile, that abandoned lot. I never told him how those road trips made me feel like my mother, a sparrow on the wing, looking for a new nest. And I never told him about Trixie.
Our heists worked the way we’d been doing them until we reached a little bank on the outskirts of Fresno. I’d always gone inside first, scouting the place out on the pretense of opening a checking account. Then I’d be the hostage when Todd stormed in and demanded the money. But this time someone was waiting for us.
The counter girl acted strangely when she saw me, and I didn’t notice anything off about the way she looked down at her lap. Now I know she was looking at my picture. She must have pressed a button or something, because a man swept up behind me and whispered in my ear that I better behave. He told me I needed to tell Mr. Daniels to surrender as soon as he walked in the door. I started crying real loud.
Customers walked over and started asking the man what he was doing, then he cuffed me on the back of the head and told me to shut up. Some Dudley Do Right took that chance to run up and deck him one, knocked the big man out cold. I thanked him and ran off in hysterics.
I found Todd in the same alley where we’d parked. There was a man at the head of the alley where Todd couldn’t see, facing away from me with a gun sticking out of his sport coat. Clean and simple, I walked up, slipped his gun out of its holster, and shot that man to death. Then I put his gun in my purse and walked into the alley, where Todd was standing with his own gun out. We hopped in the car and I explained things as we drove like mad out of California and across the Rockies.
That was at the height of summer, though I’m sure you know all about that. “Dragnet: Federal agent shot dead by Lightning T Daniels and the June Bug.” That’s what the papers started calling us around that time. The first time I ever saw those names was in the Des Moines Register. I clipped the article out and put it in the box with the little turquoise June bug on the lid. The fame and the pressure got to Todd and he started getting rough in bed, doing all those awful things to me that you used to do, the poking and prodding and twisting. But it felt so good when he did it.
He would get sullen afterward sometimes and tell me I was too beautiful for things like that. He said he was debasing me, that I was a flower and if he plucked me I’d wilt. I told him I was his June Bug and the only thing he had to do was keep me from flying away. He liked that.
And he was a good man, despite how we made our living. He didn’t yell or cheat or hit me, with a single exception on each account. The cheating I wouldn’t even call cheating. You see, pickings got slim after the botched job in Fresno. Cops were looking for us like never before, and we couldn’t stay in the same place long, much less cause a stink with a big heist. So we did little things, robbing underground casinos and junk dealers.
I carried a gun then. The agent’s mean little .38 special, in fact. I don’t know what such a big man had needed with such a tiny gun, but it fit my tiny hands perfectly. I killed three men with that gun, the agent, another, and one I’ll tell you about right here. His name was Buggy and he was something of a hot shot, for South Dakota.
Buggy knew Todd from a stint in a Minnesota prison Todd didn’t talk about much, and apparently they owed each other a host of favors. Buggy had everything Todd needed that wasn’t me, most of which came folded up in little paper squares and dollar bills. Todd started doing small jobs for Buggy, enforcing, running packages, and he’d leave me cooped up in a dingy motel for days at a time. I got sick of that real fast. It reminded me of Blunt, and all the little cages you kept me in before Blunt.
I went out on the streets and found Buggy’s place by dropping his name here and there. By the time I found the dive he operated out of, a converted speakeasy with big steel shutters over the door, Buggy knew I was coming. Buggy was a nasty guy, as his name suggests, and he had a bad habit of spectacle. He was the biggest show, the only show, in town and he made sure people knew he was important. He dressed like a mobster and let on that he knew a few made guys, though he never quite had the courage to call any by name. His suits were new and as nicely tailored as you could get out there in the sticks, but they did nothing to shape up the nasty little man. He had a sloppy gut and breasts that disturbed the spread of his lapels, along with a stringy black comb-over and a thick, warty nose.
He intercepted me just inside the door and told me where to find Todd. I had figured he wanted to keep Todd around in town, to fold him into the crew for the respect Lightning T Daniels’ name would bring. But I hated South Dakota, and that nasty little town and I wanted to leave. When I left, Todd would go with me, but only if we were still together. Buggy didn’t want that to happen.
He led me to the main room, where Todd lay back on a couch almost completely off his mind from the stuff. A pretty girl, red-haired and about my age, was on her knees in front of him, her mouth where you’d expect. I sighed as Buggy started on some rant about men these days and how he never expected he’d walk in on something this shocking. Todd’s eyes took a few seconds to focus on me, and he started trying to push the girl off him.
I think Buggy expected me to start crying and run out of that grungy hole in the ground, or maybe to just fall apart right then and there. The only thing I’m sure of is that the greasy little pusher man had a low opinion of woman. I saw his point and made him a counter-argument.
The girl, undoubtedly in on the whole thing, looked up at me with smirk on her face, almost daring me to do something. I went over to Todd, still so beautiful in his sweating delirium, and pulled his switchblade out of the interior pocket of his leather jacket. Dull recognition dawned on the redheaded girl’s face just a second too late, as I grabbed a fistful of that hair and sprang the blade open. I cut her just twice, long strokes that made an X on her pretty young face.
They didn’t bleed until I pushed her away, then they wouldn’t stop bleeding. She blindly ran from the room, screaming for somebody to help her. Buggy jumped to his feet and started toward me, cursing. I pulled the federal agent’s snug little .38 out of my purse and shot him through his ugly nose. The bullet pulled off the back part of his skull and everything inside spilled out when he hit the ground.
I remembered Trixie right then, her skull coming apart in the dark of the woodshed. Her beautiful face, so like a tiny angel’s, ghastly and malformed in the smoky light of your kerosene lantern. Dirt on my hands. Blood underneath my nails. Dogs in the woods and your harsh whisper telling me they couldn’t smell her, they wouldn’t smell her. Keep digging June. Keep digging.
I’m still digging that hole now, gonna’ keep digging until I hit bottom. Until I get down low enough to pull the sides in over me like a blanket. There may be blood and heat at the end, I know, the smell of pistol smoke and burning flesh. But before I go to hell I’ll smell that rich West Virginia earth, and I’ll feel splintered wood in my hands as I work, work, work that shovel.
She called me Sissy, God damn you. She called me Sissy.
The security man from the front came down with a pump action shotgun in his hand. I didn’t kill him, just asked him if he’d ever been shot before, and pointed at what was left of Buggy. I told him neither of us were going to miss at this distance and he agreed, dropping the shotgun. I promised not to shoot him or anybody else if they filled a tablecloth with money and drugs and didn’t try anything funny. Nobody did, so I kept my promise.
Todd never apologized for the way I found him down there. He refused to even talk to me even until we were in St. Louis. He had another friend down there, Luther, who was a much better friend than Buggy. Luther took half of what we had off our hands in exchange for the keys to a room in a northside tenement. Todd got drunk the first night and slapped me when I wasn’t expecting it.
I fell on the ground and started crying in earnest. I’d never been hit by anybody I cared about before. And it hurt so much worse than when you hit me.
He told me I was crazy and who did I think I was? He told me he didn’t know who I was anymore and asked what right I had to be involving myself in his personal matters. He told me that just because we slept together — he used a different phrase — that didn’t mean I had any right to pry into his affairs. I told him I was pregnant and he took a seat on the edge of the bed. His fine dark hair was in disarray. He apologized to me and told me he’d do whatever he could, but his heart wasn’t in it. He sounded tired, wrung out. I knew then he was probably going to leave me, and started concocting ways to keep him. Then I thought of you, and all my daddies across this great, God-fearing nation and I stopped. I really was, still am, pregnant. Rest assured, you’ll never see the child.
Todd got himself shot a couple weeks later. He burned through all the rest of our money and the drugs we’d stolen from Buggy in the days after I told him I was carrying his child. Luther set him up with a crew knocking over drug dealers in town. None of them knew he was the famous Lightnin’ T Daniels from the paper, and none of them would have cared if they did.
I don’t know the specifics of how he got hurt. I do know he showed up to the job almost too high to stand on his own. I know they relied on him to do something and he failed to do it. And I know it took some special intervention from Luther to keep the crew from putting a bullet in Todd’s head right then and there.
He was shot by a small caliber handgun. The bullet went in his thigh and bounced around inside his pelvis, leaving a half a dozen tiny tunnels. The insides of his hips now looked just like the insides of the bituminous coal mine where I first saw him, lean and pretty and leaning up against that ruined old mine cart. I had him take his pants off to show me. Blood trickled from the tiny entry wound, but everything from the bottom of his thighs to the top of his stomach was swollen and purple.
He told me he needed to go to a doctor and begged for me to get him some stuff, anything to take the edge off. I told him that wasn’t possible, we were near out of money and he’d be arrested if I took him to a hospital. He told me to do anything I could, he didn’t care what, he just needed another hit. It hurt too bad. It was killing him. Then he looked at me and told me I was killing him.
I pawned the turquoise boxes he’d bought us, most of our clothes, and the two pistols he’d acquired since we left West Virginia. Blunt felt so far away then, sitting in the dark with him dying beside me in the stale autumn heat. I spent all the money on drugs, a bit of food, and a straight razor so I could shave him, which I did. Luther stopped by about a week after Todd had been shot.
He stood in the door, repulsed by some smell I hadn’t noticed. He asked me what I was going to do, what I expected to happen. I told him I didn’t know. Todd wasn’t going to get better, and if he did he’d just leave me anyway. In the depths of his eyes, behind the drugs and the pain, I saw fear when he looked at me. No hint of love or longing, no apology for how he’d treated me, just fear, and a dull sort of hate.
Luther reached out and took my hand then, and I knew what options I had. I knew Luther wanted me, my body, terribly. I was still young and beautiful, and my pregnancy was little more than a slight bump that any dress could hide. Would he accept a child as part of my being there? I knew he would. I knew I could make him want that child as much as me, that I could sell him the Golden Gate Bridge with that hot piece of hellfire between my legs.
And I thought of you. I thought of you and a long line of daddies, stretching out across the Midwest and back into my history to the first one, the real daddy who put me on you like a curse. I thought of raising a pretty little version of myself with Todd’s hair and big blue eyes, and all the daddies I could give her. All the not-her-sisters and not-her-brothers who’d have to make way once we entered the nest. Luther kept talking while I thought of that line of violence and tainted love that had brought me to Blunt, that had shot me out of West Virginia like a cannon. That had torn my heart and soul to blackened pieces before I ever became a woman. And I thought of Trixie, who’d told me how much she’d wanted a sister. Who read so well despite how young she was, and who trusted you when you took her to play hide and seek in the woods around midnight. Who cried and called me Sissy when you told me to take that ax and “earn your keep you ungrateful little bitch.”
Luther told me he’d treat me right and ran his hand over my cheek. I looked up at him like I’d looked at Todd all those many months ago, and I asked him, yeah? Would he. And I kissed him. And he told me the cops already knew where we were, that he’d tipped them off to get a friend of his out of a bind over the trouble Todd had caused. That I really didn’t have a choice anyway.
I told him that was fine by me, because Todd was weak and a junkie to boot, and he didn’t know how to treat a lady. And I asked Luther did he? Did he know how to treat a lady? Could he show me? He asked if Todd was still there and I said yeah, he was, but he was junked out and wouldn’t wake up for hours. I told him we had a little space atop the table just inside the door, that I didn’t care about being comfortable ‘cause it’d been so long since I had a real man.
Luther smiled at me and shut the door behind him. I pulled him over to the table and sat and wrapped my legs around him, pulling him close. Our tongues met in my mouth and then his. He didn’t notice me slide the federal agent’s tiny little pistol out of my purse and put it behind his ear. He squeezed my breast and then bit my lip so hard it bled when I shot him, tearing away a thin piece of skin when he fell away.
My ears rang. Todd lay in a daze on the mattress. I went over to him anyway and lay down beside him. I told him I loved him and I meant it. And I told him he was the best thing that’d ever happened to me, and that was true too. I curled up beside him and slept one last time, never smelling the rot setting into the wounds on his stomach or the filth he was leaving behind in the bed.
I woke and started writing this. I started this morning and now it’s almost midnight. The moon is up outside and the windows are open. The breeze feels nice. Warm, despite the brown and gold leaves on the trees outside. There aren’t many of them in this neighborhood, but the ones I can see are so very beautiful.
There are men down on the street, and I know they aren’t from the neighborhood because they’re mostly white and have good posture and comfortable shoes. If they arrested me, I bet I could talk my way out of a life sentence. The papers have blamed everything on Todd, because he’s a man and nobody believes women can do evil things, not really. That if they do evil things, they’re trite and pointless. Crimes of passion, neglect, or stupidity.
Understand that everybody that has died on our sojourn across America is dead because I was sick of getting ice cream at Busser’s. Because I wanted more than the quiet security the men you preyed on provided. Because I couldn’t handle the guilt of what I did to Trixie, or face the consequences like an honest human being.
I could have ended this thing whenever I wanted to, and I didn’t.
I hate you, mama. I hate you like you wouldn’t believe. Or maybe you do. You never mention your mama and I can only imagine she was just like us, or at least bad enough you turned out the way you did. I’m not writing you to say goodbye, I’m writing you so that you know I did this all on my own. I did it for me, because I’m my own bad person, not because you corrupted me or because Todd drove me crazy. I did this. All of this. And I did it for me.
And if anybody else happens to read this, you should understand that Todd was the innocent bystander. Tell his mama or papa or whoever is still around that he got wrapped up with a bad woman who twisted him around her finger like a piece of taffy. That he could have walked away from that armored car or me or this life at any time if I’d have let him. And he wanted to. But I didn’t.
And, if anybody else happens to read this, Trixie Macintosh is buried in a busted old woodshed off Rural Route 5 outside of Blunt, West Virginia. She was the most wonderful little girl and I killed her with an ax because I’m a coward.
I’m going to finish this letter now, and leave it up here on this table. Then I’m going to take Todd down off the bed and bring him by the window. The breeze is nice and I want him to feel that before I take that straight razor I bought and send us both to hell. And God I hope there is a hell, ‘cause if there is then there is a heaven. And if there is, that Trixie will be up there with her mama, living some sort of happiness.
And that when you die, you’ll be down here with me.
-June Bug
westsidefairytales.com
submitted by realTylerBell to nosleep [link] [comments]


2016.05.16 04:33 jayschmoney Benzo blackout stories?

Since i want to hear your stories, here's mine. I was with a buddy of mine in kermin Ca and we decided to have a nice day of getting lit. Well my friend eddy had a zan connect; so we bought 6 of those. My other friend and his girl came from fresno so we could go to a dispensary in goshen. We go to the dispensary, pick up an 8th of tree, and a girl scout cookies wax pen. Before we left the village, we stopped for burgers at buzzes best burgers in the valley, this is where my night begins.
We arrive at buzzes giddy with excitement. I order a bacon cheeseburger and a large crush. After careful deliberation, me and ed decide to drop 1 zan each in our drinks. After eating, we leave and i start to feel the effects. After we arrive in kermin we get refills and drop another zan in our drinks. This is where it gets spotty.
I remember losing the wax pen and spending approximately (as told to me from others) 7 hours going back between the cars looking for it. I drove my car from kermin to clovis following my friend. Apparently i was swerving driving fast and crazy for over 45 minutes of driving across the valley. My phone was dead all day. I awaken from this daze the next afternoon with no recollection of anything after my famed drive. I came to find out i popped 4 that night.
Theres a lot of missing pieces and spotty memories. Names and places are not actual. But are rough estimates of actual location.
I want to hear everyones stories!!!
submitted by jayschmoney to Drugs [link] [comments]


2015.11.03 23:58 Madoff_Hitler420 Candyland. Hybrid of GDP and Girl Scout Cookies. Grown locally in Fresno, CA

Candyland. Hybrid of GDP and Girl Scout Cookies. Grown locally in Fresno, CA submitted by Madoff_Hitler420 to trees [link] [comments]


2013.02.26 22:04 sirkushmore So thick and HAIRY! Girl Scout Cookies from Fresno, California.

So thick and HAIRY! Girl Scout Cookies from Fresno, California. submitted by sirkushmore to trees [link] [comments]


2013.01.31 09:02 sirkushmore Girl Scout Cookies! Fresno, CA grown :-)

Girl Scout Cookies! Fresno, CA grown :-) submitted by sirkushmore to trees [link] [comments]


Girl Scouts Gold Award - GIRLtopia Journey - Vision Girl Scouts of Central California South - World Thinking Day 2012 Highlights! Fresno Bee - YouTube Girl Scouts Suing Boy Scouts For Stealing All Their Female ... Girl Scouting Around The World 2013 501st at the Fresno Girls Expo Girl Scouts Heart of Central California Campership Girl Scouts make a special delivery of appreciation

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